Sunday, September 18, 2016

Vic’s Election Notes on Education #37– September 17, 2016

Dear Friends,

[Note: There is no link between “Vic’s Election Notes on Education” and any organization.]

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Have your heard of the proposal called Education Savings Accounts which would dismantle public education?

Between now and November 8th while candidates are listening, every public school advocate should ask every candidate for the Indiana General Assembly to go on record to oppose Educational Savings Accounts. Tell them that their opposition to ESA’s is necessary to get your vote.

Why? Educational Savings Accounts are the pernicious proposal first filed in bills during the 2016 legislative session which would lower standards and provide approximately $6000 on a debit card to any parent who signs an agreement to school their child in “reading, grammar, mathematics, social studies and science.” The bills provided no supervision of the way the $6000 is spent and no criminal background checks on the adults receiving the debit card money such as criminal background checks required for teachers.

These damaging bills, already passed in some form in Arizona, Florida, Nevada, Mississippi and Tennessee, are right out of Milton Friedman’s plan to end public schools and leave education to a marketplace of private schools, all funded by the taxpayers but without government oversight or transparency.

Now both Representative Behning (House Education Chair) and Senator Kruse (Senate Education Chair) have said in media reports that Educational Savings Accounts will be on their agendas in January in the new session.

Candidates listen to voters during the election campaign. They listen better now than at any other time in the electoral cycle. This is your time to bend their ear about Education Savings Accounts. Get them on record that they will oppose Education Savings Accounts.

Remind them that this is our bicentennial year when we are celebrating our public education heritage going back to the 1851 Constitution. This is not the time to undermine our public education system with this radical proposal called Education Savings Accounts.
[Please note: Indiana Code 3-14-1-17 says that government employees including public school employees may not “use the property of the employee’s government employer to” support the “election or defeat of a candidate” and may not distribute this message “on the government employer’s real property during regular working hours.” Ironically, the law does not prevent private school employees from using computers purchased with public voucher money to distribute campaign materials. Private schools now financed in part by public voucher dollars have retained all rights under Indiana’s voucher laws to engage in partisan political campaigns.]

Education Savings Accounts: House Bill 1311 filed in January 2016

The 28-page HB 1311 was sponsored by the powerful chair of the House Ways and Means Committee, Dr. Tim Brown, a member of the House leadership. It would:
  • give approximately $6000 on a debit card to any parent who signs a state agreement. This money would go directly to parents and would no longer go to school districts.
  • narrow and weaken the curriculum and remove many students from Indiana’s new standards. Parents getting the money only have to agree to provide an education in “reading, grammar, mathematics, social studies and science.” No music! No art! No physical education! No foreign language! No health! No vocational subjects! Who would think this would provide a good education?
  • end accountability for many students. Parents could take their child out of any school and pay “a participating entity”, which may be an individual, a tutoring agency, a distance learning program, or a licensed occupational therapist approved by the Indiana Treasurer. No requirement to take ISTEP is included for those students who are not enrolled in a school.
  • expand vouchers to more students. HB 1311 would give public money to families earning up to $97,000 (family of four). Using a sliding scale, families earning $97,000 would get a 70% voucher, far more than the 50% voucher now given to families earning $65,000 or less. Family income limits would disappear completely for special education students, giving even high income families taxpayer money for private schools. Currently for special education students, eligibility for vouchers is capped at incomes of $85,000 (family of four). Indiana’s voucher program was passed in 2011 as a program for low income families, but that rationale has now disappeared.
  • pay textbook fees for private schools while public school parents get no help with textbooks. HB 1311 makes textbooks for private schools or private programs a taxpayer expense.
  • allow parents to divert money intended for K-12 education to their 529 college fund. This is an incentive for parents who can afford to pay for their current private school to enroll in the program, take the money intended for K-12 education and put it in a 529 college account instead.
  • leave the education money to be supervised by the parent without fraud protection. A weak section of fraud consequences for a “participating entity” that has “routinely failed”, but no mention is made of parents who neglect their duties or commit fraud with their child’s money.
  • omit criminal background checks for parents to get the money. Background checks are being expanded for public school teachers but ESA’s would give public money to parents without comparable background checks.
Tell all legislative candidates during the fall campaign that you strongly oppose this radical plan!


Powerful Forces are Lobbying for Education Savings Accounts

A well-funded pro-voucher group called Hoosiers for Quality Education has strongly pushed Education Savings Accounts, starting with a Statehouse rally last January. Hoosiers for Quality Education for years has actively funded candidates during the election campaign to build their influence. They have given Jennifer McCormick $30,000 in her campaign for State Superintendent against Glenda Ritz. They have given donations to numerous other candidates for the General Assembly, which will give them access to legislators next January as they press for Education Savings Accounts, a measure their lobbyist last January called “the future of school choice in Indiana.”

Glenda Ritz has opposed this plan since it was unveiled last January. At the August 27th ICPE meeting In Indianapolis, she said she is “adamantly opposed” to Education Savings Accounts which would lead to the “total dismantlement of our public system.”

Jennifer McCormick also spoke at the August 27th ICPE meeting and for the first time spoke in opposition to ESA’s, saying that they would take money away from public school districts.

It is good to have both State Superintendent candidates on record against this damaging proposal, but they will not vote on the plan. We need to get all General Assembly candidates from both sides of the aisle on record against Education Savings Accounts during the campaign.

That’s where you come in.

As you talk with candidates and attend candidate forums, make sure they know what Education Savings Accounts are and how strongly you oppose this radical plan. To help you in this task, a one-page flyer of talking points against ESA’s is located here. Please share it with candidates as well as colleagues and friends of public education.

I urge all public school advocates to protect public education from the Milton Friedman voucher supporters and from Education Savings Accounts. Don’t let this issue get overlooked during this unprecedented election campaign.

Thanks for advocating in support of public education!

Best wishes,

Vic Smith

There is no link between “Vic’s Election Notes on Education” and any organization. Please contact me at vic790@aol.com to add an email address or to remove an address from the distribution list.

Some readers have asked about my background in Indiana public schools. Thanks for asking! Here is a brief bio:

I am a lifelong Hoosier and began teaching in 1969. I served as a social studies teacher, curriculum developer, state research and evaluation consultant, state social studies consultant, district social studies supervisor, assistant principal, principal, educational association staff member, and adjunct university professor. I worked for Garrett-Keyser-Butler Schools, the Indiana University Social Studies Development Center, the Indiana Department of Education, the Indianapolis Public Schools, IUPUI, and the Indiana Urban Schools Association, from which I retired as Associate Director in 2009. I hold three degrees: B.A. in Ed., Ball State University, 1969; M.S. in Ed., Indiana University, 1972; and Ed.D., Indiana University, 1977, along with a Teacher’s Life License and a Superintendent’s License, 1998. In 2013 I was honored to receive a Distinguished Alumni Award from the IU School of Education, and in 2014 I was honored to be named to the Teacher Education Hall of Fame by the Association for Teacher Education – Indiana.

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Thursday, September 15, 2016

NEIFPE's statement about the proposed Business Personal Property Tax

Northeast Indiana Friends of Public Education was formed to help educate ourselves as well as our community about many of the recent reform measures coming from the state that we feel are damaging public education.
  • Our legislature has created a system to label our schools as “failing” by creating their A-F grading system.
  • They created the “voucher” or “school choice” program which has siphoned money away from public schools.
  • They have demeaned educators as well as our Superintendent of Public Instruction.
  • The majority of this state voted to change our state constitution to place caps on our property taxes which has put many school systems behind in capital projects and has forced them to cut transportation for students.
The measures NEIFPE so frequently speaks out against have happened at the state level. Never did
we think the attacks would come at us locally. With Jason Arp’s proposal to exempt Business Personal Property from local taxes, our schools will once again take huge hits from transportation and capital projects. Fort Wayne Community Schools will notice the biggest loss and will be forced to reduce transportation even further. The proposal will also increase property tax bills for every real estate owner in Allen County who has not reached the tax cap. That includes approximately 65% of all homeowners in the County. The majority of homeowners are inside FWCS, so it's safe to say that the impact on FWCS families will be more significant than in other districts.

Please contact your city councilman to ask him to vote against this proposal. Education is already under attack; we do not need to see further damage coming from our own backyard. You can find your city councilman by using the link below, complete with email, phone, and mailing address.

http://www.cityoffortwayne.org/city-council.html

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Thursday, August 25, 2016

Vic’s Statehouse Notes #264 – August 25, 2016

Dear Friends,

Public education advocates should come to the ICPE meeting this Saturday, August 27th!

For the sixth year in a row since ICPE was founded, all members of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education as well as all who support public education are invited to the Dean Evans Center of Washington Township Schools, 8550 Woodfield Crossing Blvd (the corner of 86th and Woodfield Crossing Blvd), Indianapolis on Saturday, August 27, 2016 at 2:00pm for an important program:
  • Jennifer McCormick, Republican candidate for State Superintendent will speak first as the meeting begins at 2:00 pm.
  • State Superintendent Glenda Ritz, Democratic candidate for State Superintendent will speak around 2:45 pm.
  • After both candidates have spoken, the ICPE Legislator Report Card will be released. For the first time, ICPE has given letter grades to 107 incumbent legislators running for reelection based on their votes on keys bills which show their support or lack of support for public education.
Those present will get all the information and explanations of the Legislator A-F Report Card which will then be released to the media.
Other regional ICPE meetings in our annual fall series have been planned, each with different programs related to the fall elections:
  • · Evansville - September 12, 2016 at 6:30 pm- Evansville Central Public Library
  • · Bloomington – September 19, 2016 at 6:30 pm – Bloomington City-County Bldg.
  • · Lafayette – September 22, 2016 at 6:30 – Lafayette Jefferson High School
  • · Merrillville – October 5, 2016 at 6:30 - Merrillville High School
Please note: At this point, it appears that this Saturday August 27th will be the only ICPE fall meeting in which both candidates for State Superintendent have been able to accept our invitation to speak.

This fact along with the release of the ICPE Legislator Report Card make Saturday’s meeting one that public school advocates will not want to miss.

Please tell your public school friends about it and then join us on Saturday, August 27th at 2:00pm (E.D.T.).

Click here for a downloadable flyer. It will help you share the meeting information with your friends and colleagues.

Thank you for your support of public education!


Best wishes,

Vic Smith

“Vic’s Statehouse Notes” and ICPE received one of three Excellence in Media Awards presented by Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, an organization of over 85,000 women educators in seventeen countries. The award was presented on July 30, 2014 during the Delta Kappa Gamma International Convention held in Indianapolis. Thank you Delta Kappa Gamma!

ICPE has worked since 2011 to promote public education in the Statehouse and oppose the privatization of schools. We need your membership to help support ICPE lobbying efforts. As of July 1st, the start of our new membership year, it is time for all ICPE members to renew their membership.

Our first 2016 membership meeting for all members and for all who support public education who might consider membership is set for Saturday, August 27, 2016 at 2pm at the Dean Evans Center of the Washington Township Schools. Candidates for State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick and Glenda Ritz will address our meeting in separate presentations and the ICPE Legislator Report Card will be released giving a letter grade for support of public education to the 107 incumbents running for reelection to the General Assembly. Come and join us on August 27th!

Our lobbyist Joel Hand continues to represent ICPE at interim study committees. We need your memberships and your support to continue his work. We welcome additional members and additional donations. We need your help and the help of your colleagues who support public education! Please pass the word!

Go to www.icpe2011.com for membership and renewal information and for full information on ICPE efforts on behalf of public education. Thanks!

Some readers have asked about my background in Indiana public schools. Thanks for asking! Here is a brief bio:

I am a lifelong Hoosier and began teaching in 1969. I served as a social studies teacher, curriculum developer, state research and evaluation consultant, state social studies consultant, district social studies supervisor, assistant principal, principal, educational association staff member, and adjunct university professor. I worked for Garrett-Keyser-Butler Schools, the Indiana University Social Studies Development Center, the Indiana Department of Education, the Indianapolis Public Schools, IUPUI, and the Indiana Urban Schools Association, from which I retired as Associate Director in 2009. I hold three degrees: B.A. in Ed., Ball State University, 1969; M.S. in Ed., Indiana University, 1972; and Ed.D., Indiana University, 1977, along with a Teacher’s Life License and a Superintendent’s License, 1998. In 2013 I was honored to receive a Distinguished Alumni Award from the IU School of Education, and in 2014 I was honored to be named to the Teacher Education Hall of Fame by the Association for Teacher Education – Indiana.

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Friday, August 19, 2016

Select Group is Served by Vouchers

NEIFPE member Terry Springer wrote this op-ed for the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette about School Vouchers.

Select group is served by vouchers
Parochial schools less diverse, open

August 19, 2016

As a public school teacher for 36 years and public school advocate, I take issue with the sad and heavy-hearted responses of Tiffany Albertson (Aug. 3) and John Elcesser (Aug. 8) to Phyllis Bush’s July 19 op-ed criticizing school choice.

Albertson, the principal of Bishop Luers High School, and Elcesser, executive director of Indiana Non-Public Education Association, make similar assertions: Bush’s criticisms are unwarranted and divisive because the voucher program is good for students and families. They paint a rosy picture of a program which gives parents choice and supports diversity. The rosy picture dims if you examine the data on vouchers. The data clearly show that the criticisms are justified.

Vouchers did not create school choice. Parents have always had the choice to send their children to public schools or pay the tuition for private school. The difference is that through vouchers, our tax dollars are sent to private schools, which in Allen Country are exclusively parochial schools.

Vouchers were originally promoted as a way for families with limited income to send their children to private schools from failing public schools. After five years, the pretense of providing such opportunity has disappeared. Data from the Indiana Department of Education and the Choice Scholarship Report indicate most voucher students are not leaving failing schools; in fact, 52 percent have never attended public school!

The data from the area parochial high schools that accept vouchers show the increase in voucher students as legislators have changed the qualifying criteria. Between 2011 and 2016, the increase in vouchers is staggering and the percentage of increase jaw-dropping. (See the chart below.)



Obviously, the number of students is not growing at the same rate as vouchers in any of these schools. Education money is paying for students already in parochial schools rather than new students transferring to them.

Voucher money comes off the top of the education budget before money for public schools. In 2015-16, the net cost to taxpayers for private/parochial education through vouchers totaled a whopping $53 million.

Additional data also indicate that not all voucher-accepting schools are what Elcesser calls “beautifully diverse.” Albertson stated that Bishop Luers has a diverse population with 52 percent Caucasian and 48 percent minority, but the 2015-16 data from the DOE shows 62 percent white, 38 percent minority. Despite the 10 percentage-point difference, Luers’ population seems fairly diverse, and these numbers are similar to the diversity of FWCS high schools which range from Northrop’s 61 percent white, 39 percent minority to South Side’s 21 percent white, 79 percent minority.

The same cannot be said of the other schools: Bishop Dwenger (86 percent white, 14 percent minority); Concordia Lutheran High School (78 percent white, 22 percent minority); Blackhawk Christian Middle/High (87 percent white, 13 percent minority). Elcesser might take a closer look at actual data for this area before claiming that vouchers have “opened doors to thousands of children of color.”

Diversity also encompasses economic differences. The proportion of students at FWCS high schools who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch ranges from a high of 79 percent to a low of 49 percent. For the parochial schools, the range is 37 percent to 0 percent, suggesting little correlation between vouchers and poverty in these schools.

Accredited, voucher-accepting schools must comply with many of the same regulations as public schools; however, there is one very significant difference. Public schools are open to all students; parochial schools taking vouchers are not.

To attend the parochial schools in Allen County, students must complete applications that require basic information along with ISTEP scores, letters of recommendation, family financial information, placement exams and interviews by administrators. The parochial schools in our area charge an application fee ($35-$50) and/or registration fee ($100-$165) upon acceptance. And here is the key phrase – upon acceptance. Voucher-accepting schools can and do reject students.

Understandably, voucher parents are taking advantage of a program that benefits them and their children. But if these parents want a different kind of education – a faith-centered education – then they should pay for it. If they cannot afford it, then they should take that up with the religious institution.

Elcesser’s argument that voucher parents are taxpayers and their tax dollars should go to the school of their choice is rather like the argument that my tax dollar should only go to repair the roads and bridges I travel on or to pave my driveway. Public education benefits the whole community; private education does not. The arguments for the money following the child fly in the face of that perspective.

There are 1,046,527 Indiana children in public schools and 84,241 in private, mostly parochial schools. Our tax dollars should work for the public good. We should support public schools that open their doors and educate all children. Our tax dollars should not be used to pay for religious education for the few.

As Indiana’s Constitution states, knowledge and learning are “essential to the preservation of a free government,” and the General Assembly should “provide, by law, for a general and uniform system of Common Schools, wherein tuition shall be without charge, and equally open to all.”

Terry Springer is a retired teacher and member of Northeast Indiana Friends of Public Education.

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Thursday, August 18, 2016

ALEC's Goal is to Leave Out Regular Hoosiers

NEIFPE member Michelle Bandor wrote this op-ed for the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette about ALEC.

ALEC's goal is to leave out regular Hoosiers
August 18, 2016

ALEC is at it again.

It isn’t enough that the American Legislative Exchange Council is funded by corporate membership fees ranging from $7,000 to $25,000 yearly, receives millions of dollars in direct grants from these corporations, and receives huge grants from corporate CEO-funded foundations such as the Charles G. Koch Foundation.

This time, top corporate sponsors of this year’s ALEC annual meeting last month in Indianapolis included Exxon Mobil (creator of bills to protect the interests of coal, oil and gas and a major climate-change denier) and AARP, which this year was a “Trustee Level” sponsor and gave out free AARP-branded USB power packs to legislators and others at registration.

You’d think ALEC and its sponsors, with its focus on “model legislation,” would spend more time improving legislator knowledge of democracy and responsiveness to the real needs and interests of the people in their districts.

If the above paragraph sounds vaguely familiar, I have used Rep. David Wolkins’ sentence structure and style from his editorial “Lesson to be learned” in the July 27 Journal Gazette, in which he lambastes, without reason, the Indiana State Teachers Association.

Wolkins is not only blinded by his ideology, but he seems to be putting blind faith in ALEC, a group of corporate lobbyists and state legislators who “vote as equals on ‘model bills’ to change our rights that often benefit the corporations’ bottom line at public expense,” according to www.alecexposed.org.

Wolkins asks, “What message are we sending to our kids when teachers choose to protest, rather than debate, the ideas and people with which they disagree?”

Were teachers invited to the ALEC annual meeting? Are teachers invited to any of the meetings where this so-called “model” legislation is being crafted? The for-profit, corporate education company Connections Academy has a seat at the table; where are the public school representatives? How can teachers – and the average citizen – offer valuable ideas to the so-called “debate” when they are not invited to the meetings?

Who really benefits from ALEC legislation? Had Wolkins been paying attention, he would have noticed more than ISTA members protesting the ALEC annual meeting. There were members of the UAW, AFT, National Letter Carriers Union, Indiana Moral Mondays, Central Labor Council and more.

These groups represent and speak for thousands more of us “average citizens” who are seriously concerned about legislation that threatens the public good. When we’re not asked for our input and opinions, we protest.

What happened to Rep. Wolkins’ Hoosier common sense? Did he lose it on one of his all-expense-paid luxury trips from ALEC? And he crabs about ISTA members getting a free T-shirt!

Whether we label ourselves “conservative” or “liberal” matters little when our state legislators succumb to the paternalistic “behind-the-scene” machinations of ALEC. With ALEC, state lawmakers and business people have a “voice and a vote.” But what about the rest of us?

Wolkins says of ISTA that “they are all for the students, so long as students’ interests don’t conflict with those of ISTA members.” We could say the same about Wolkins: Rep. David Wolkins is all for the citizens of his district in Indiana, so long as his constituents’ interests don’t conflict with ALEC and its corporate members.

Michelle Bandor is a Fort Wayne resident and a member of the Northeast Indiana Friends of Public Education.

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Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Vic’s Statehouse Notes #263 – August 15, 2016

Dear Friends,

All members of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education and all who support public education are invited to the Indianapolis membership meeting of ICPE on Saturday, August 27, 2016 at 2:00 pm for an outstanding program:
  • Jennifer McCormick, Republican candidate for State Superintendent will speak first as the meeting begins at 2:00 pm.
  • State Superintendent Glenda Ritz, Democratic candidate for State Superintendent will speak around 2:45 pm.
  • After both candidates have spoken, the ICPE Legislator Report Card will be released. For the first time, ICPE has given letter grades to 107 incumbent legislators running for reelection based on their votes on keys bills which show their support or lack of support for public education.
Those present will get all the information and explanations of the Legislator A-F Report Card which will then be released to the media.
For the sixth year in a row since ICPE was founded, the first fall ICPE meeting will be held at the Dean Evans Center of Washington Township Schools, 8550 Woodfield Crossing Blvd, at the corner of 86th and Woodfield Crossing Blvd, Indianapolis.

This program deserves the attention of all public school advocates!

Please mark your calendar, tell your public school friends about it, and then join us on Saturday, August 27th at 2:00 pm (E.D.T.).

Please use the attached flyer to share the meeting information with your friends and colleagues.

Thanks for your support of public education!

Best wishes,

Vic Smith

“Vic’s Statehouse Notes” and ICPE received one of three Excellence in Media Awards presented by Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, an organization of over 85,000 women educators in seventeen countries. The award was presented on July 30, 2014 during the Delta Kappa Gamma International Convention held in Indianapolis. Thank you Delta Kappa Gamma!

ICPE has worked since 2011 to promote public education in the Statehouse and oppose the privatization of schools. We need your membership to help support ICPE lobbying efforts. As of July 1st, the start of our new membership year, it is time for all ICPE members to renew their membership.

Our first 2016 membership meeting for all members and for all who support public education who might consider membership is set for Saturday, August 27, 2016 at 2pm at the Dean Evans Center of the Washington Township Schools. Candidates for State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick and Glenda Ritz will address our meeting in separate presentations and the ICPE Legislator Report Card will be released giving a letter grade for support of public education to the 107 incumbents running for reelection to the General Assembly. Come and join us on August 27th!

Our lobbyist Joel Hand continues to represent ICPE at interim study committees. We need your memberships and your support to continue his work. We welcome additional members and additional donations. We need your help and the help of your colleagues who support public education! Please pass the word!

Go to www.icpe2011.com for membership and renewal information and for full information on ICPE efforts on behalf of public education. Thanks!

Some readers have asked about my background in Indiana public schools. Thanks for asking! Here is a brief bio:

I am a lifelong Hoosier and began teaching in 1969. I served as a social studies teacher, curriculum developer, state research and evaluation consultant, state social studies consultant, district social studies supervisor, assistant principal, principal, educational association staff member, and adjunct university professor. I worked for Garrett-Keyser-Butler Schools, the Indiana University Social Studies Development Center, the Indiana Department of Education, the Indianapolis Public Schools, IUPUI, and the Indiana Urban Schools Association, from which I retired as Associate Director in 2009. I hold three degrees: B.A. in Ed., Ball State University, 1969; M.S. in Ed., Indiana University, 1972; and Ed.D., Indiana University, 1977, along with a Teacher’s Life License and a Superintendent’s License, 1998. In 2013 I was honored to receive a Distinguished Alumni Award from the IU School of Education, and in 2014 I was honored to be named to the Teacher Education Hall of Fame by the Association for Teacher Education – Indiana.

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Monday, August 15, 2016

Letters: Public school boosters support parochial, too

NEIFPE member Meg Bloom sent this letter to the editor. In it she responds to a pro-voucher letter to the editor.

Public school boosters support parochial, too
Published: August 14, 2016

I read with interest Tiffany Albertson’s response to Phyllis Bush’s op-ed about vouchers (Aug. 3). I am a retired public school teacher with 28 years of experience. In the interest of transparency, I need to note that I, like Bush, am a member of Northeast Indiana Friends of Public Education. Albertson, the principal of a school that benefits greatly from vouchers, did not tell us her role at Bishop Luers – and I find that to be troubling and hypocritical.

Albertson talks about her school’s diversity. While a diverse population might be the case at Luers, it is not the case in many schools accepting vouchers. Schools accepting vouchers do not have to accept all students and are able to pick and choose the students they will educate. Public schools welcome all students all the time.

I am fully supportive of parents who desire a parochial education for their children. This has long been a valued option in American education. My problem is with public education money being used for religious education, which is what is happening with our current voucher system. Some families want a parochial education; others do not. But I think that those who cannot afford private education should seek help from their church and not from the public school coffers.

I, along with Bush and the other members of NEIFPE, will always be opposed to money being diverted from public schools to private and parochial schools. We at NEIFPE have never said that parochial schools do not do a good job. We simply say public dollars for public education.

Meg Bloom

Fort Wayne